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Today, some sign the contract on the day of the wedding, some do it as an earlier ceremony, and some do not do it at all.In Haredi communities, marriages may be arranged by the parents of the prospective bride and groom, who may arrange a shidduch by engaging a professional match-maker ("shadchan") who finds and introduces the prospective bride and groom and receives a "brokerage-fee" for his or her services.

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If the husband and wife were both taken captive, the historic Jewish view was that the rabbinic courts should first pay the ransom for the wife, selling some of the husband's property in order to raise the funds.

As for men who committed adultery (with another man's wife), Abba ben Joseph and Abba Arika are both quoted in the Talmud as expressing abhorrence, and arguing that such men would be condemned to Gehenna.

According to prominent Jewish writers of the Middle Ages, if a man is absent from his wife for a long period, the wife should be allowed to sell her husband's property, if necessary to sustain herself.

In order to offset the husband's duty to support his wife, she was required by the Talmud to surrender all her earnings to her husband, together with any profit she makes by accident, and the right of usufruct on her property; By contrast, if a husband mistreated his wife, or lived in a disreputable neighbourhood, the Jewish religious authorities would permit the wife to move to another home elsewhere, and would compel the husband to finance her life there.

In order to be valid, this must be done in the presence of two unrelated male witnesses.

After erusin, the laws of adultery apply, and the marriage cannot be dissolved without a religious divorce. Marriage obligations and rights in Judaism are ultimately based on those apparent in the Bible, which have been clarified, defined, and expanded on by many prominent rabbinic authorities throughout history.

Erusin changes the couple's interpersonal status, while nissu'in brings about the legal consequences of the change of status.

In Talmudic times, these two ceremonies usually took place up to a year apart; the bride lived with her parents until the actual marriage ceremony (nissuin), which would take place in a room or tent that the groom had set up for her.

Orthodox brides and grooms attend classes on this subject prior to the wedding.

The niddah laws are regarded as an intrinsic part of marital life (rather than just associated with women).

The Talmud argues that a husband is responsible for the protection of his wife's body.

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