Spanish horney chatline - Who invented the method of radioactive dating for turin shroud

The Shroud of Turin is much older than suggested by radiocarbon dating carried out in the 1980s, according to a new study in a peer-reviewed journal.A research paper published in Thermochimica Acta suggests the shroud is between 1,300 and 3,000 years old.

who invented the method of radioactive dating for turin shroud-51

"The radiocarbon sample has completely different chemical properties than the main part of the shroud relic," said Mr Rogers, who is a retired chemist from Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, US.

Fire damage He says he was originally dubious of untested claims that the 1988 sample was taken from a re-weave.

These tests revealed the presence of a chemical called vanillin in the radiocarbon sample and in the Holland cloth, but not the rest of the shroud.

Vanillin is produced by the thermal decomposition of lignin, a chemical compound found in plant material such as flax.

Trusting that Jesus was the Son of God come to earth to take on a human body, and then crucified taking on the sins of the world, to return from the dead and then to be resurrected to heaven is enough.

God does nothing without reason or plan, and I can't fathom His leaving something confusing like this. Even if it is proven that the shroud dates to c.33AD, what does that prove? It simply proves that you have a 2000-year-old burial shroud.

"This stuff was manipulated - it was coloured on purpose." In the study, he analysed and compared the sample used in the 1988 tests with other samples from the famous cloth.

In addition to the discovery of dye, microchemical tests - which use tiny quantities of materials - provided a way to date the shroud.

They only way any truth can be gained from the shroud is through testing it's age again - to get some measure of certainty.

David Appleyard, Halifax, UK The Shroud is one of the most intriguing antiquities in the world. Tradition has often been confirmed by scientific investigation.

It is said to have been restored by nuns who patched the holes and stitched the shroud to a reinforcing material known as the Holland cloth.

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